Pennsylvania Fireside Tales Volume 2

Jeffrey R Frazier

Non-Fiction

In offering a second volume of Pennsylvania mountain legends and folktales to the reading public, the author does so with a note of appreciation to all who found the first volume...

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In offering a second volume of Pennsylvania mountain legends and folktales to the reading public, the author does so with a note of appreciation to all who found the first volume of legends of interest - public and press alike.  The old stories and folktales which appeared in my Pennsylvania Fireside Tales Volume 1 and which seemed to strike a "chord" within me, also apparently appealed to others as well.  Most people like these survivors from a bygone day - a time that was simpler in many ways than this present hectic age.  In turn, these "survivors" not only help to perpetuate that feeling of kinship some of us feel toward these rugged Pennsylvania hills, but they also connect us to a rich fabric of history and to the people who lived it.  With that link or connection, they cause us to feel closer to the past; our life's span seems extended, and we seem less mortal.   It is with this background, then, that this second volume of Pennsylvania fireside tales is presented for the public's reading enjoyment.  As explained in the first volume of this series, the title "fireside tales" comes from the fact that these stories and legends are variants of, or are exactly like, episodes that were related by early settlers sitting around their fireplaces on cold winter evenings when story-telling was the only form of entertainment by which to relax.  Return now to those days of old when the pace was slower and life was harder.  Keep in mind, however, that people then seemed content with their lot, finding pleasure in simple things like a wolf's howl, a panther's cry, a firefly's glow, or a flaming sunset sinking slowly behind the everlasting hills.

In this volume:

  • The Black Ghost of Scotia
  • Juniata Gap
  • Through the Veil
  • Snakes, Snakes, Snakes
  • The Lower Fort
  • Spellbound
  • Last of the Big Shots
  • Haunts of the Highway
  • More Snakes
  • Little Red Riding Hood?
  • Burned at the Stake
  • Ridden
  • Dead for Three Days?
  • Mollie Maguire Memories
  • Sitting with the Dead
  • The Throwback
  • Bloody Run
  • Beyond Belief
  • Jack’s Narrows
  • Nights in the Colby Narrows
  • Western Pennsylvania Wolf Days

    by Jeffrey R Frazier
    Page Count: 200
    Trim Size: 6 x 9
    Publish Date: April 16, 2024
    Imprint: Catamount Press
    Genre: History

    NATURE / Ecosystems & Habitats / Mountains
    HISTORY / United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic (PA) |
    FICTION / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales & Mythology

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    Janet Piper
    Terrific Compilation of Folksy Tales

    I just finished Pennsylvania Fireside Tales Volume 2. This is a series of, I think it said, about 7 books. I didn't read volume one, but that's OK. Each book stands alone and offers complete folksy tales and the research behind them. The book has drawings of highlights of the stories which made them come to life.

    Each tale is interesting. I remember my grandmother telling stories from her memories of Western Pennsylvania. She was sure her tales were true, but back then in my teenage mind, she believed in superstition.

    This book first tells the tale and then explains where the stories originate, which is appreciated. I particularly liked the story of the Banshees. It gave me goosebumps when he recalled the story of a man from Ireland who immigrated to America with his two brothers. The man was killed in a coal mine, and the brothers mailed a letter home to Ireland to inform their parents. The letter finally arrived weeks later, after having been on a boat, however, the parents already knew their son was dead because the Banshees had told them. Is that superstition? It doesn't sound like it, but how can this be explained?

    I really liked this compilation of folksy tales, and I think you will too, especially if you like to sit around the campfire in the evenings and remember the good old days. Well done!